Commenting on “The Future” email

I have received this email, or very similar, several times this year.  Obviously written by someone (or someoneS) that do not have basic understanding of physics, electricity, etc.
My comments are in red.

Subject:
Very Interesting future Predictions

Pick your job carefully if your (you’re) young

The Future  ??

Auto repair shops will go away.

So did “muffler shops”

A gasoline engine has 20,000 individual parts.  I do not believe that number, I would believe 2,000 
An electrical motor has 20. (another number I do not believe.  Have you ever opened up an electric motor? ) Electric cars are sold with lifetime guarantees and are only repaired by dealers.
It takes only 10 minutes (I do not believe that number) to remove and replace an electric motor. Faulty electric motors are not repaired in the dealership but are sent to a regional repair Read More

Ham Club Tips: How to Ruin Your Hamfest

How to Ruin Your Hamfest (swapmeet)

    1. Find someone that is completely unfamiliar with your state AND cannot read a map.  Then put him in charge of hamfest “talk-in”.  Your club can earn bonus points if this person drinks an entire fifth of whiskey before the doors open.
    2. If you unfortunately find that the only volunteer to run “talk-in” can actually read a map it is permissible to use this volunteer.  He must, however, be provided with maps that use names for all roads which do not match roadsigns.  For example, the hamfest is on U.S. Highway 441 and all intersection signs show 441, the “talk-in” volunteer shall only refer to this as “Range Line Road”.  The words “four fourty one” must never be uttered.

Read More

RF Connectors; what frequency range for connector type?

Starting a new project and you are wondering what RF connector would be most appropriate? 

Found an interesting webpage that has a simple, quick, clear, chart which shows us the maximum frequency range for many types of RF coax connectors.

Click the link to get to the webpage for RF & Connector Technology webpage for connector frequency ranges.

$2,800,000 fine for bogus “amateur radio” transmitters for drones

June 5, 2018, the FCC announced a $2.8 million fine against Hobby King for repeatedly selling mis-identified un-certified transmitters.  The transmitters, mostly, were advertised for sending live video from unmanned aircraft back to the ground for viewing by the U.A.S. operator.

Hobby King misled website visitors into believing that these transmitters were compliant with FCC regulations for use by licensed Amateur Radio Operators.  The transmitters did not even operate on frequencies which are available to licensed operators!

The FCC had looked into the matter and corresponded with Hobby King in the past.  F.C.C. informed Hobby King that these devices were not compliant Read More

FCC confiscates equipment from N.Y. pirate broadcaster

WASHINGTON, May 15, 2018
Taking action against a pirate radio operator, Federal Communications Commission agents, in coordination with the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the Southern District of New York and the U.S. Marshals Service, seized radio transmission equipment from an unauthorized radio station on April 10, which was operating illegally in Manhattan.  The FCC’s Enforcement Bureau has been leading an effort to crack down on this illegal activity, resulting in unlawful broadcasts going off the air, seizure of equipment, fines against pirates, proposed fines against pirates and property owners actively aiding pirate radio operations, and numerous other enforcement actions.

“Pirate radio stations are illegal, as they operate without an FCC license, and cause real harm. 
These stations can cause interference to legitimate, licensed broadcasters and can prevent those broadcasters from delivering critical public-safety information to listeners,” said Rosemary Harold, Chief of the FCC’s Enforcement Bureau.  “We are pursuing multiple legal routes to stop pirate broadcasters and this seizure action in Manhattan is one of them. We thank our partners in the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the Southern District of New York and the U.S. Marshals Service, and we’re particularly thankful for the great work of FCC field agents in combatting this problem.” 

“Rumba FM,” which broadcast on 95.3 FM from a high-rise apartment building in Manhattan, was operating without an FCC license, as required by law. The FCC issued multiple warnings to the illegal operators but the radio station continued to broadcast. Pursuant to a federal court order, authorities seized equipment operated by the illegal radio station at that station’s antenna location on St. Nicholas Avenue in Manhattan.

 

The Communications Act of 1934 prohibits the operation of radio broadcasting equipment above certain low-intensity thresholds without a license issued by the FCC. The Act authorizes the seizure and forfeiture of any electronic or radio frequency equipment used to broadcast without an FCC license. The number of available radio frequencies is limited, and unlicensed broadcasting can interfere with the broadcasting of legitimate licensed radio stations, potentially causing chaos in the radio spectrum.

 

In an action to seize a pirate radio station’s equipment, the FCC performs the initial investigation. Once the FCC has built a case against the station, the matter is referred to the relevant U.S. Attorney’s Office, which is then responsible for filing the case and obtaining a warrant to seize the illegal radio equipment from the court. The U.S. Marshals Service is responsible for executing the warrant and seizing the pirate radio station equipment, with FCC personnel provide technical assistance during the seizure.

Another possible cause of T.V.I. ?

“T V I” means Tele Vision Interference.  

The most common causes of TVI are bad powerline insulators, poorly designed LED bulb circuits, poorly designed transmitters.  And, sometimes, the receiver is just overloaded by a nearby strong transmitted signal.

I think I found another source of TVI when I stopped in Douglas, Wyoming and spotted this.

It’s just a cellphone snapshot, I wish I had a better image for you.   But in the center of the image you can see a UHF television receiver antenna….  and it is mounted directly to the radiating element of an 11 meter CB transmitter antenna.

How to select the proper fuse for your circuit

Found a good article on selecting fuses for your project on a website called “Power Electronics”

Here is a snippet from that article, listing the design factors explained in the article.

Proper selection of an input fuse for a dc-dc converter involves 
understanding and consideration of the following factors:
 1. Voltage Rating
 2. Current Rating
 3. Interrupting Rating
 4. Temperature Derating
 5. Melting Integral (I2t)
 6. Maximum Circuit Fault Current
 7. Required Agency Approvals
 8. Mechanical Considerations

Largest FCC Fine Ever ! For spoofing robocalls

96,000,000 Robocalls !

WASHINGTON, May 10, 2018—
The Federal Communications Commission today fined Adrian Abramovich $120 million for malicious spoofing that was part of his massive robocalling operation aimed at selling timeshares and other travel packages.  The caller ID spoofing operation made almost 100 million spoofed robocalls over three months. The Truth in Caller ID Act prohibits callers from deliberately falsifying caller ID information with the intent to harm or defraud consumers or unlawfully obtain something of value.
The FCC proposed this fine in the summer of 2017.  In response to the proposed fine, Mr. Abramovich claimed that he had no intent to cause harm, and that the proposed forfeiture amount was unconstitutional.  The Commission determined that the evidence did not support these claims and is imposing a fine in the amount originally proposed, the largest forfeiture ever imposed by the agency.

Mr. Abramovich, of Miami, Florida, or companies he controlled, spoofed 96 million robocalls in order to trick unsuspecting consumers into answering and listening to his advertising messages.  To increase the likelihood that consumers would answer his calls,  Mr. Abramovich’s operation made calls that appeared to be local—a practice known as “neighbor spoofing.”  The messages indicated that the calls came from well-known travel or hospitality companies such as Marriott, Expedia, Hilton, and TripAdvisor, and prompted consumers to “Press 1” to hear about “exclusive” vacation deals.  Those who did were transferred to foreign call centers where live operators attempted to sell vacation packages—often involving timeshares—at destinations unrelated to the named travel or hospitality companies.

The Federal Communications Commission received numerous consumer complaints about these calls. In addition, the Commission heard from companies such as TripAdvisor, which received complaints from consumers who believed the robocalls had come from the company.   Medical paging provider Spōk also complained after its network was disrupted by these calls, thus interfering with hospital and physician communications. Both companies actively helped the investigation.
Official F.C.C. statements and more are at this link.